SCOPE OF WORK:

The LDM Group was commissioned by the KwaZulu Natal Province, The Premier’s Office to provide support to the institutional structure and coordinate the implementation of the 1.15 Billion Rand Dukuduku Onsite Settlement Project across the multi-governments as the Project Management Team (PMT).

 

 

ABOUT THE PROJECT

 

INTRODUCTION

The area, which borders a World Heritage Site and forms part of the internationally renowned iSimangaliso Wetland Park, is undergoing a multi-million rand development upgrade. This will improve the living conditions of the residents; boost the economy and launch a potentially vibrant eco tourism trade.

The Dukuduku Project was kick started by the provincial government in 2015, ending a longstanding conflict between human settlement and conservation.  It’s the first-of-its-kind project in the area, and aims to integrate the people with the pristine forest that also includes the Umfolozi Swamp State Forest and the Umfolozi flood plains that feed the St Lucia Estuary.

The Project team, made up of strategic government departments, the Mtubatuba Municipality and the community, have agreed on a ‘develop to conserve’ approach. In terms of this agreement government has undertaken to formalise the settlement, provide social services and put in key infrastructure.
The community have agreed to abide by all relevant laws and to stop illegal farming activities on the flood plain in return for government funded development.

The project site is made up of 4,348 hectares of state land, and is divided into three nodes, namely: Khula, Ezwenelisha and Dukuduku. The establishment of Khula Village is well under way as parts of projects phase one process.
A number of exciting job creation projects are also on the cards.
The Dukuduku Project is about developing an Integrated Sustainable & Responsible Community within a World Heritage Site – an equitable; vibrant human settlement, strengthened through the cultural diversity of its people.

 

THE DUKUDUKU TRUST

The Dukuduku Trust came into being in 2011 and is made up of all community stakeholders in the Dukuduku area, the land claimants who lodged a successful land claim over the area, the municipality and various government departments as a means of codifying a social compact.

The goal is to work with all stakeholders to ensure an integrated develop of the land and provide for the welfare of the occupants of the Dukuduku area.

The Dukuduku Trust was established out of an understanding that the administration of that area would be handled through the trust. The land claimants agreed to remove the land in the trust area from their land claim. Certain parts of iSimangaliso Wetland Park, which fall into the project area, would be de-proclaimed in order to provide for the development of these areas for the benefit of the occupants of the Dukuduku area.

In addition, the trustees are tasked with the administration of unlawful activities occurring within the trust area, specifically the unlawful sale of land and the administration of the dispute resolution system that is aimed at dealing with land legal disputes.

The Trustees provided for in the Trust are comprised of:

  • Two representatives from the Department of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs;
  • Two representatives from the Dukuduku Land Claimants;
  • One representative from each of the communities in Dukuduku: namely Ezwenelisha, Khula Village and Dukuduku Forest;
  • Two representatives from the Department of Human Settlements;
  • Two representatives from the Mtubatuba Municipality; Two representatives from the Mpukunyoni 
Traditional Council.

The residents of Dukuduku, just outside St. Lucia in KwaZulu Natal are excited. The town is finally getting an upgrade – a full-blown make-over. Not only has construction begun to improve the roads and other infrastructure to the area, but the once divided community will now function under one umbrella.

It all starts with a fresh new logo and other corporate branding. In November 2016, Pillay Laurenz Media and Communications, together with education and branding specialists, Dawn Harrison & Ambu Madilonga held workshops at two schools in Dukuduku to get community involvement in the design of the logo and new branding.

“We engaged grade 11 learners in two high schools in this area of Dukuduku, Vezobala High School which is deep in the Dukuduku forest and Silethukukhanya High School situated in Kula Village,” explains Walter Ntsele, the Dukuduku Community Liaison.

“It went very well.  The children were very excited, and they produced helpful
imagery and slogan ideas. We then took the work to the designers so that they could work on it and produce a professional logo.”

It was important for the community to be actively involved in this re-branding process as the three different villages, which once functioned independently from each other, will now be known as simply: Dukuduku.  Dawn Harrison, who has run many successful projects of this nature, began by first giving the learners a theoretical guideline as to how to design the logo. The idea, in the end, was to take elements from each of the student’s submissions and incorporate it in the final design.

“It was a very hot day in the forest-but the kids gave it their all,” enthuses Dawn.

“They were responsive and engaged completely. It was very clear that they were all very aware of the uniqueness of the environment they live in; Dukuduku is also part of the world-famous iSimangaliso Wetland Park, and lies adjacent to a UNESCO World Heritage site.”

After a few “icebreaking” games and singing – to energise the children – they were divided into groups and instructed to take four things into consideration; they were to come up with a logo to represent all three of the Dukuduku villages, a colour pallet, a slogan, or pay-off line, and finally a name that represents all three villages.

“We gave them a few options that we found through our social facilitation with the community,” Dawn explains. “There was already an 80% support for the name “Dukuduku’ within the community, which incidentally was also the name all the children chose.”

Apart from the name, which was unanimous, Dawn and her team also saw the same images come up in all the children’s submissions – trees, butterflies, insects and flowers. In the end, the final logo comprises a tree and butterflies. The tree is significant in that it represents nature’s roof, is protective and provides shelter and shade. Butterflies represent the delicate balance of nature and the metamorphosis of a community into something vibrant, unique, successful, and bountiful. Incidentally, there a hundred and ten different butterfly species in Dukuduku, many of which are endemic to the area.

And finally after sifting through words like nature’s home, pride and special, which the children came up with, a pay-off line emerged – Dukuduku: At Home in Nature. Dawn, Walter and the team feel that the exercise was productive and dynamic in that it embraced the ideas, feelings and creative input of the local community.

“We thought that it would be wise for us to use talents of the children at the schools   because we believe that schools in the area represent the entire community,” Walter says.

“These are children that were born here, grew up here, and who love their area very much.”

 

WEED ERRADICATION PROGRAMME

The Expanded Public Works Programme is a national plan aimed at drawing unemployed South Africans into productive work. A good example of this is the Weed Eradication Project at Dukuduku on Kwa Zulu Natal’s north coast, where 290 jobs have been created as part of the Dukuduku Project.
the Dukuduku

The Dukuduku Project is a first-of-its-kind in the area, where state land has been set aside for development. The project aims to integrate the people within a pristine forest and adjacent to the iSimangaliso Wetland Park – a World Heritage site.

The natural beauty of the area draws tourist, boosting the local economy, but alien plant species are choking the indigenous plant life. These weeds are also threatening community crops growing in demarcated, state authorised farming areas. And with the region being so vast and green, it takes a large team to carry out this job.

The community have agreed to abide by all relevant laws and to stop illegal farming activities on the flood plain in return for government funded development.

The project site is made up of 4,348 hectares of state land, and is divided into three nodes, namely: Khula, Ezwenelisha and Dukuduku. The establishment of Khula Village is well under way as parts of projects phase one process.
A number of exciting job creation projects are also on the cards.

The Dukuduku Project is about developing an Integrated Sustainable & Responsible Community within a World Heritage Site – an equitable; vibrant human settlement, strengthened through the cultural diversity of its people.

 

www.dukuduku.co.za